Bernardo Bertolucci

Introduction

Bernardo Bertolucci is one of the most celebrated filmmakers in the history of cinema. He was an Italian director, screenwriter, and producer who was known for his bold and controversial works. Bertolucci was a master of visual storytelling, and his films often explored complex themes such as politics, sexuality, and identity. In this blog post, we will take a closer look at the written works of Bernardo Bertolucci, his awards and achievements, and some of his most famous movies.

Bernardo Bertolucci Written Works

Bernardo Bertolucci

The Dreamers (2003)

The Dreamers is a 2003 film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. The movie is set in Paris in 1968 and follows the story of an American student who becomes friends with a French brother and sister. The film explores themes of politics, sexuality, and identity, and is considered one of Bertolucci’s most controversial works. The Dreamers was based on the novel “The Holy Innocents” by Gilbert Adair.

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

Last Tango in Paris is a 1972 film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. The movie stars Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider and tells the story of a young Parisian woman who enters into a passionate and violent sexual relationship with an American businessman. The film is known for its explicit sex scenes and controversial subject matter, and is considered one of Bertolucci’s most famous works. The screenplay for Last Tango in Paris was written by Bertolucci and Franco Arcalli.

Bernardo Bertolucci Awards

Academy Awards

Bernardo Bertolucci was nominated for nine Academy Awards throughout his career, winning two. He won his first Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for The Last Emperor in 1988. The film also won Best Picture and Best Director, making Bertolucci the first Italian director to win the award. Bertolucci’s second Academy Award was for Best Director for The Last Emperor.

Cannes Film Festival

Bernardo Bertolucci was a regular at the Cannes Film Festival, and his films were often well-received by critics and audiences alike. He won the Palme d’Or, the festival’s top prize, for The Conformist in 1970. He also won the Grand Prize of the Jury for The Sheltering Sky in 1990.

Bernardo Bertolucci Movies

The Last Emperor (1987)

The Last Emperor is a 1987 film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. The movie tells the story of Pu Yi, the last Emperor of China, and his life from childhood to adulthood. The film won nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director, and is considered one of Bertolucci’s most successful works.

The Conformist (1970)

The Conformist is a 1970 film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci. The movie tells the story of a young Italian who becomes a fascist and is tasked with assassinating his former professor. The film is known for its stunning cinematography and exploration of political themes. The Conformist won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1970.

Bernardo Bertolucci and Composer

The Last Emperor (1987)

The Last Emperor features a score by composer Ryuichi Sakamoto, who worked closely with Bernardo Bertolucci to create a musical soundtrack that complemented the film’s visual style. The score won an Academy Award for Best Original Score, and is considered one of the most iconic film soundtracks of all time.

The Sheltering Sky (1990)

The Sheltering Sky features a score by composer Ryuichi Sakamoto and David Byrne of the Talking Heads. The soundtrack blends traditional Moroccan music with modern electronic sounds, creating a unique and haunting atmosphere that perfectly complements the film’s themes of alienation and identity.

Last Tango in Paris Scene

The Butter Scene

The most controversial scene in Last Tango in Paris is the “butter scene,” in which Marlon Brando’s character uses butter as a lubricant during a sexual encounter with Maria Schneider’s character. The scene was highly controversial at the time of the film’s release, and has been the subject of much debate and criticism in the years since.

The Apartment Scene

Another notable scene in Last Tango in Paris is the “apartment scene,” in which Marlon Brando’s character confronts Maria Schneider’s character about her past. The scene is notable for its intense emotional content and powerful performances by both actors.

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