Abraham Sofaer

Introduction

Abraham Sofaer was a British character actor who made a name for himself in Hollywood during the 1950s and 1960s. He appeared in a variety of television shows and movies, including Gunsmoke, Star Trek, and The Twilight Zone. Despite his success, Sofaer faced several challenges throughout his life, including eye problems that affected his career and personal life. In this blog post, we’ll explore Sofaer’s life and career, including some of his most memorable quotes.

Early Life and Career

Abraham Sofaer

Abraham Sofaer was born in Rangoon, Burma (now Myanmar) in 1896. His family was of Jewish descent and had roots in India. Sofaer attended the University of London, where he studied law and became a barrister. However, he soon realized that his true passion was acting, and he began performing in local theater productions. In the 1930s, Sofaer moved to Hollywood and began working in film and television.

Eye Problems and Career Challenges

Throughout his career, Sofaer struggled with eye problems that affected his vision and made it difficult for him to perform. He had several surgeries to correct his vision, but the problem persisted. Despite this, Sofaer continued to work in Hollywood and appeared in many popular television shows, including Gunsmoke, The Twilight Zone, and Star Trek. However, his eye problems eventually forced him to retire from acting in the late 1960s.

Star Trek and Memorable Quotes

One of Sofaer’s most memorable roles was in the Star Trek episode “A Taste of Armageddon,” in which he played the character of Anan 7. In the episode, Anan 7 is the leader of a planet that is at war with another planet. Rather than fighting a physical war, the two planets have agreed to a computer simulation that determines which citizens would have died in a real war. Sofaer’s character delivers the famous line, “War is never imperative, only when it’s necessary,” which has become a favorite among Star Trek fans.

Personal Life and Legacy

Outside of his acting career, Sofaer was married to Angela Psyche Christian, a dancer and choreographer. The couple had two children together. Sofaer passed away in 1988 at the age of 91. Despite his eye problems and other challenges, Sofaer left behind a legacy as a talented actor and performer. His memorable roles in shows like Star Trek continue to be celebrated by fans around the world.

Net Worth and TV Shows

Abraham Sofaer’s net worth is estimated to be around $1 million. Throughout his career, he appeared in a variety of popular television shows, including Gunsmoke, The Twilight Zone, and Star Trek. He also appeared in films such as Elephant Walk, The Nun’s Story, and The Ten Commandments. Despite his eye problems and other challenges, Sofaer continued to work in Hollywood and left behind a legacy as a talented actor and performer.

FAQ

Who is Abraham Sofaer?

Abraham Sofaer was an actor and voice actor who was born on October 1, 1896, in Rangoon, Burma, and died on January 21, 1988, in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, California, USA.

What were Abraham Sofaer’s notable works?

Abraham Sofaer appeared in numerous films, television shows, and stage productions during his career. Some of his notable works include his role as the high priest in the film “Quo Vadis,” his portrayal of the Hindu guru in the film “Elephant Walk,” and his role as the Telarite ambassador in the “Star Trek” episode “Journey to Babel.”

Did Abraham Sofaer have any eye problems?

Yes, Abraham Sofaer had a condition known as strabismus, which caused his eyes to cross. This condition was noticeable in many of his film and television appearances.

What are some memorable quotes by Abraham Sofaer?

One of Abraham Sofaer’s most famous quotes is from the “Star Trek” episode “Journey to Babel,” in which he played the Telarite ambassador. When asked why he was so argumentative, he replied, “It’s our nature. We enjoy a good argument, Captain. We are a most… pugnacious people.” Another memorable quote of his is from the film “Quo Vadis,” in which he played the high priest. When asked about the Christians, he said, “They are a disease. A disease that must be wiped out.”

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